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I was thinking of this myself as a means of getting into rallying. You could try a U2U to Andrew Purcell but I reckon a start is to join a motor club, get a competition licence, buy a FIA approved crash helmet and fire suit, boots, etc, buy a book about co-driving, save up some cash as there are no free rides at the bottom-you might need to pay for the entries and share costs with the driver. Anyone else got an opinion on this one.
 

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new co driver

as well as the suggestions above, there are a few motor clubs with rally schools, and navigation classes
Omagh,dugannon, UAC are 3 I know of. Mayo have a codriver day on a Sunday soon, before their stages rally
try a local competitor who will help you.
 

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Colin O'Keeffe
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suppose watch as much on board videos as possible, not at wrc level, but at national and international. The RPM on board stuff is good. I have the Colin Mcrae DVD from kilarney, full stages and as I use the same system as him its great to wach so you can get a feal for it..
 

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Navigator Required
Thursday, February 02 2006 13:42 by Brian Armstrong - 1149 hits


Description: Navi required to sit in class 12, in Border rally championship.
An maybe other rallies.
Must pay sum exspenses!
Name: Brian Armstrong
Phone: 0771 8666930 NI/UK (+44 7718 666930 ROI/Int.)
Email:
Expiry Date: Thursday, March 02 2006 16:42


This is on Rally.ie site-so there you go-you have it all now
 

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ruby dont think that man is looking for a novice thats a quick seat he's at the sharp end of the border scene
 

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the first steps really are to find a novice driver that needs a co driver but at the start you have to be willing to share the expences. if you cant find one then join a motor club.there will be lots of new comers. if your looking for a good book then rally navigation by Martin holmes is the one you want
 

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paul gallagher
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if you can get some one to learn you about time cards and time controls learn and understand pacenotes a great help is you can get hold of notes for a stage and go out and read the notes over that stage,and never be afraid to ask for help on my first rally my fellow navi's were great help
 

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CHECK DOWN BELOW AND MAKE SURE YOU HAVE BALLS AS YOU WILL NEED THEM, GET FRIENDLY WITH A DRIVER AND TRY AND DRIVE A STAGE WITH NOTES SO HE CAN TELL YOU HOW U SHOULD TIME THE NOTES. DID THE CASTLE SS 2 WKS AGO AND HAD TO EXPLAIN TO 6 NOVICE NAVI S BOUT TIMECARDS. GREAT TO BE ABLE TO HELP AND IF U GET A SPIN HAVE A LAUGH IF U CAN
 

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My advice for what it's worth.
1.Join a motor club as suggested above.
2.Get involved with the organisational side of things first for a while.This will give you a better understanding of time cards,road sections,passage controls etc.
3.Get to know other competitors in the club you join and you will find them helping you all the way.It's important that you go this way if you've never been involved as these guys/gals with show you things over a period of time rather than trying to learn everything a week before your first outing.
4.Ask someone you know for a time card from a previous event and go through it to make sure you understand what's required,practice substracting stage start times from stage finish times.Heading for passage control at the end of a stage is not the time to be trying to work out how to do this.

I know looking at the things listed above makes look like a daunting task but it's not really,and it's great fun for the most part.
But for me the most important part is to become involved in the organising side for a while,it really is the best way to learn the ins and outs.
 

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T531 BKV
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Night Navigation is the key - when i started out on my first rally i felt pressure all the time - road sections where the worst as i always feared booking in late or early or sending us the wrong way on the road section.

If you feel very comfortable with the road sections and time cards etc then u can relax between stages and then when u get to the stage ur calm and that will help you with the notes.

In my opinion alot of navigators dont really understand what they are calling - to them its just letters and numbers, if u think like that u will never be any good. You have to have a big understanding of what your calling to your driver.

This will help alot because when your calling something like for example " 5 left over crest into sudden hairpin right" - the fact that u know what that looks like will make u call it in such a tone that the driver will automatically realise that he is coming to a bad bit of the road.

One thing i wud also suggest is get a road book and pacenotes of a local tarmac rally - get a willing driver - and recce the route = road sections and all. Of course when on the "stage" u must obey the rule of law and be sensible.

This should help alot :)
 

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As with most things in life crawl before you can walk and walk before you can run. Most though not all the top co-drivers I know started in night navs - it is an invaluable basic introduction to rallying. All the principles right up to WRC level are there. The main differences between night navs and stages rallying are expense and written pacenotes. Even in night navs one learns to read or call the road ahead.
Pat4wd is spot on and once you have mastered the basics follow patrickis above.
There would appear to be a shortage of good nav's at the top end so if it is for you then I look forward to seeing you out there.
Golden rule - if in doubt always ask - if something does not make sence to you then you are rarely alone - the difference being, pride will not allow the others to ask. Finally the bulk of other co-drivers will amost always help you - we all had to start somewhere.
 
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